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Explosion Proof vs Intrinsically Safe Lights for Combustible Work Sites

Industrial facilities that handle flammable gas, liquids, fibers or dust require special lighting equipment for safety. In such environments, businesses rely on intrinsically safe units or explosion proof lights.

Both types of lamps offer safe operation. However, their designs vary greatly. Read on to learn about the difference between intrinsically safe and explosion proof lights.

Industrial Lights and Intrinsic Safety

Intrinsically safe lighting ensures the components inside the unit cannot produce sparks. As a result, there is no need to contain or isolate parts. In most cases, intrinsically safe lights operate on low voltage. This makes compliance with regulations in confined spaces less meticulous.

By definition, a confined space is a location that cannot be entered or exited easily and may contain hazardous compounds in the atmosphere.

Another unique feature of intrinsically safe lights is safe surface temperatures. Such fixtures can operate without the risk of the surface accidentally igniting combustible elements in the surrounding environment. An intrinsically safe light may include a temperature sensor to streamline monitoring.

Explosion Proof (Class I, II, III)

Explosion proof lights provide protection in hazardous locations by containing sparks inside the unit, so that it cannot ignite combustible compounds outside of the fixture. Insulating components be must sturdy, as a contained ignition inside the unit should not cause the surface of the light to reach ignition levels of flammable elements in the surrounding environment.

To reduce the creation of sparks, an explosion proof lighting system is typically constructed of copper-free aluminum and other non-sparking materials. Explosion proof lights do not have to be low voltage.

Such lighting systems are categorized, based on the following Classes: Class I, Class II and Class III. Hazardous conditions are classified into two Divisions: Division 1 and Division 2. Lastly, combustible elements (gas, vapors, dust or fibers) are categorized under various Groups.

Types of Heat Sinks for LED Work Lights

Compared to traditional incandescent lamps, LED fixtures operate at cool temperatures. The main reason for this feature is the lack of infrared radiation emitted during use (doesn’t apply to infrared LED Work lights).

Heat sinks inside the units also contribute to active cooling. From a manufacturing perspective, there are several types of LED heat sinks available on the market today.

Aluminum Heat Sink Designs

Aluminum is a common material used for LED heat sinks. Designs for the heat-dissipating component vary, depending on the needs of the LED light. A stamping aluminum heat sink takes on the shape of a plate with indentions for active heat management.

On the other hand, an extruded aluminum heat sink is used for molded design requirements. This type of LED heat sink is characterized by its thin cooling wings. Compared to a stamping heat sink, this variant is typically applied to circular LED fixtures. The former heat sink option is usually found on LED light bars and rectangular LED lamps.

Die-cast aluminum heat sinks for LED units are sturdy. However, the wings are not as widespread resulting in less heat dissipating capabilities.

Benefits of Heat Sinks for LEDs

Heat sinks are designed to improve the lifespan and performance of LED lighting systems, especially for components prone to high-heat generation. Furthermore, the parts ensure light uniformity during use.

Extreme heat can cause inconsistent light quality for LEDs, forcing the units to flicker or shift in color temperature. For industrial work sites, this is a major concern, as luminaries play an essential role in safety at the workplace.

Other options for heat sink materials include copper and thermoplastics. Copper offers cost-effective benefits, while thermoplastics are suitable for compact LED work lights. These days, high-quality plastics can also be utilized for LED heat management. Additionally, the latter option comes with lightweight advantages.

LED Lighting Applications in Machine Vision

Intricate and meticulous tasks, such as machining in industrial work sites, require special LED lighting fixtures for processing and accurate detection of colors.

For operators, it is top priority to select an LED light that can help produce high-quality images, resulting in consistent output on the floor. This is easier said than done, however, as most markings are extremely small or undistinguishable.

Types of Machine Vision Lights

LEDs for machining vary greatly, depending on their applications. A type of LED lamp that is used frequently for machining is a ring light. The luminary is low cost and can be used for diffused illumination or specular surface reading.

An LED backlight functions roughly the same way as an LED ring light. However, the compact fixture is primarily utilized for measuring external dimensions and viewing openings around the object.

For inspecting flat surfaces and labels, a diffuse on-axis light (DOAL) can be used. This luminary is installed on the side of the machine and leverages beam splitters and reflectors to ensure even illumination.

Object or packages with thick wrappers make it difficult for operators to detect barcodes and serial numbers on the surface. To address such concerns, a more powerful beam, UV illumination or infrared lighting can be applied.

LED Chips and Colors

Modern LED chip designs allow businesses in the industrial sector to incorporate lighting in tight spaces. COB LEDs are an example of a cutting-edge LED chipset that is made up of a group of LED chip diodes on a circuit board. This robust configuration promotes active thermal management. Up to 25 percent less heat is emitted when using this type of LED chip.

Selecting the right colors may also be beneficial for active detection of labels and barcodes. Some selections, such as red or blue, cause surfaces and textures to appear bolder.

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SOOW Cords for Industrial Lighting 101

The sturdiness of industrial lighting systems hinges on the type of materials used, as well as the cutting edge design of the fixture. Rugged materials, such as copper-free aluminum and polycarbonate, are frequently applied during the manufacturing process to boost reliability during operation at the work site.

Such materials typically come with specific ratings, which dictate their thresholds and ability to withstand harmful elements, including UV rays, corrosion and water. For heavy-duty cords used for industrial lighting units, one of these standards is called SOOW.

What is SOOW?

The term ‘SOOW’ is an acronym used by manufacturers to inform operators about the properties of the cord. In the acronym, the letter ‘S’ refers to service. In some cases, it is important to consider that when a letter ‘J’ does not appear after this starting letter, the cord comes with a 600V rating (for portable cords). For instance, an SJOOW cord features a 300V rating.

Next, the letters ‘OO’ suggest the cord is resistant to oil, while the letter ‘W’ is applicable to capabilities of withstanding water and rough weather. For extremely rugged work sites, a Type W cable is recommended, which can accommodate heavy usage over long periods.

Compatibility with Industrial Lights

SOOW cords are highly beneficial for industrial fixtures in construction sites, mining facilities, manufacturing plants and more. In addition to the acronym designation, the standard is usually followed by a set of part numbers, such as 18/2 or 16/2.

These mysterious numbers refer to the type of cable being used. Taking the first example above, an SOOW 18/2 cord can be defined as a 600V-rated service cord that is oil, weather and water resistant, with an 18 American Wire Gauge (AWG), two-conductor cable. To reduce confusion at the work site, manufacturers may provide color coding on the units.

Basics Of Getting A Construction Lighting

Construction lighting is essential to illuminate streets and working areas found in the vicinity of construction sites. This allows workers to continue working despite the lack of daylight during nighttime or when the daylight available is not sufficient to illuminate their working area.

The following are the different requirements needed for construction lighting.


Depending on a particular working area at the site, the lighting equipment must be able to fulfil the illumination intensity requirements in order for the construction to take place as smoothly as possible using the provided lighting. Due to the different activities being done in different working areas, each of them has their own specific requirements. Activities like surface and underground construction require medium illumination while rough installation works require either standard illumination.

Choice of Lamps

The consistent illumination in all the working areas of construction depends on the type of lamps used. It should also be put in mind that the cleaning and maintenance of the lamp surface are manageable and should be attended to every time it is needed since impurities left on the lamp reduces the amount of illumination needed. Priorities should be focused on lamps which have a wide radiation band and should conform to at least the IP23 Standard. Read more.

Arrangement of Lamps

The lamps should be arranged so that they give off consistent illumination. They should be positioned in a high place so that it gives an overall illumination of the working area. The arrangement of the lamps should also provide the advantage of being able to use several lamps with less power. If lamps are placed in strategic positions, they should be able to illuminate danger zones to avoid any mishaps from happening. The lamps should also be positioned in places which avoid workers from getting blinded.

Special Danger Zones

The illumination provided by the lights should be able to reduce the risk of accidents, especially in danger zones. Examples of dangerous areas are those with vehicles and pedestrians; cliffs; areas with small spaces; etc. It is also better to use different light colours at different danger zones.Another requirement needed regarding danger zones is the presence of emergency lighting equipment giving off at least 1 lux should the general source of lighting break down.

What Is The ‘Right To Light’?

It is generally accepted that about half a room should be lit by natural light. In relative terms, this is the same amount of light given by one candle up to one foot away. This rule is known as a ‘right to light’, and is protected in England and Wales under common law, adverse possession, and by the 1832 Prescription Act.However, unlike the right to freedom from noise, the right to light must be acquired.

This can be achieved through registration or granted by deed. Additionally, if a window or an opening has had 20 years or more of unobstructed daylight, it automatically receives the right to light. Ifa property is protected by the right to light, then developments in the surrounding area are subject to certain restrictions. This is because if a new building reduces the amount of natural light coming in through a window or opening to an unacceptable level, then it will be deemed as an ‘obstruction’.


When it comes to construction lighting, it is also important to determine the intensity and type of lighting needed depending on the present condition of the different processes and work at the construction. For more information visit:





Amber LED Lights Applications for Outdoor and Rugged Tasks

Dangerous tasks performed outdoors require the use of colored lights for safety. For tow trucks and service fleets, amber LED lights are commonly applied, which is widely accepted for visual warning applications.

Found on LED strobe lamps and LED light bars, it is permissible to purchase these types of emergency lights. However, because the luminaries are closely associated with certain safety standards and official fleets, the utilization of such light color for work safety is heavily regulated.

Tow Trucks and Service Fleets

Amber is considered to be an effective warning light, next to blue (mostly used for law enforcement and official government fleets). In the US, local legislation governs the application of LED work lights. For example, in New Jersey, service vehicles that are commercially registered are allowed to use flashing amber strobes (N.J.A.C. 13:24-4.1[a]2).

Moreover, snow removal, plowing and service vehicles for sanding operations may rely on amber fixtures for real-time warning, when engaged in the task.

In other parts of the world, amber LED lights are used more frequently. For instance, in Quebec, the local transportation authority allows vehicles going on extended trips to apply for a special permit for the application of rotating amber lamps. Furthermore, fleets that carry out refueling and street maintenance are encouraged to use the colored warning lights without special authorization.

Civilian Applications 

Mainstream applications for amber LED lights are numerous. Most permissible uses for the light color involves automotive units. Vehicles used for leisure off-roading, such as ATVs and compact trucks, can use amber lights without needing to apply for a special permit.

Agricultural vessels, such as tractors, cultivators, loaders and wheeled irrigation systems, may also use the colored lights without risk of citations. In most cases, the equipment comes with the amber LED light installed.

Outside of work lighting applications, amber LED lights are revolutionizing skin therapy in the medical sector.

Addressing Vibration for Industrial Light Towers in Construction Sites

How does vibration affect industrial light towers? This article covers types of wind-based and environmental factors that contribute to vibration for poles supporting lights.

First and Second Mode Vibration

Vibration experienced by poles and masts is categorized under first mode and second mode. First mode refers to infrequent, but powerful gusts of wind encountered by the mast. During such occurrences, most of the movement or swaying is happening at the top of the pole. Compared to second mode, this type does not always contribute to damage, since most units are designed to address first mode vibration. Signs of first mode vibration includes the movement of light beams from side to side.

During second mode vibration, most of the shaking is happening at the center, foundational components of the mast. Winds are consistent and frequent, sometimes reaching 35 mph. Persistent pressure-shifting experienced by the unit results in stress and fatigue. Second mode vibration is difficult to detect because the equipment on top of the mast is unfazed by the shaking. Operators can detect such occurrences by listening for a humming sound from the pole.

Factors to Consider (Height and Location)

There are several factors that can either contribute to or reduce vibration for industrial light towers on construction sites. Masts taller than 25 feet are more prone to experiencing wind-based vibration. Furthermore, the load of the pole (when mounting equipment at the top) should never be exceeded, as it could cause unnecessary strain on the structure.

Lastly, the location of deployment could dictate the amount and type of vibration encountered by the light mast. Construction sites, airports, parking lots and bridges are locations that experience massive amounts of vibration on a regular basis, from moving cars and airplanes. Large fields, as well as high and low elevation areas that are unprotected by crippling winds are also prone to high-level vibration.

What is a Class III Work Site

In the US, industrial safety regulators categorize classified work sites into various groupings: Class I, Class II or Class III. Out of the three classifications, Class I and Class II which involve the presence of flammable gases or vapors and dusts, are considered to be the most common.

Class III Work Site, governing combustible fibers and flyings, is rarely covered because such facilities are not as widespread. However, because Class III locations are equally as dangerous as Class I and Class II sites, it is important to understand the safety standards that govern this grouping.

Class III Work Site Hazards and Definitions

Examples of Class III hazardous locations include the following: textile mills, woodshops and cotton storage centers. Class III equipment, which includes heavy-duty lighting systems and portable tools, are equipped with more or less the same set of features that contain ignitions inside the unit. An exception to this practice is wiring installations for Class III, Division 2 locations.

In most cases, flammable fibers and flyings in Class III facilities are not floating around in the air. Instead, Class III particles tend to build up on immobile machines or permanent structures over time. The accumulation of fibers become extremely dangerous when exposed to an ignition source, such as a spark or intense heat.

Reducing the Accumulation of Heat

It is best practice to maintain adequate ventilation in Class III facilities.  This is because fibers or flyings can accumulate on machines, causing heat to become trapped inside the unit. Increasing the operating temperature of equipment can cause malfunction or in the worst-case scenario – result in a fatal explosion, when igniting an unstable, flammable compound.

Class III motors or generators are fully enclosed and have special temperature requirements for certain machines. Open units (without switching features) and squirrel-cage textile motors are examples of machines that can easily exceed Class III temperature standards.

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Options and Tips in Construction Site Lighting

Basically, there are three main safety options in construction light– regular, access and staircase, and emergency lighting. To help ensure building safety, more than just natural lighting is necessary. Lighting can even be customized to make it possible for use even during power outages. In addition to functionality, they can also provide some aesthetic value to the construction site without necessarily having to cost a lot of money.

Levels of lighting

If a certain part of the building is temporarily being used for work or as an office, it is recommended that sufficient lighting be provided to make sure that the workers can clearly see the work area. Regardless of how the interior lighting is designed and installed, it is important to make sure that it provides no obstruction to the construction going on. See more.

A building should never be without staircase or access lighting. This will help ensure safety for people who move around in the building. Especially in specific areas that are conducive to robberies and other similar criminal activities, adequate construction light must be ensured. This is one of the more important options in construction lighting that must not be overlooked as employee safety may be at stake.

Develop a lighting plan

First, it’s important to develop a lighting plan for each job. Creating a Temporary Construction Lightsscheme helps you and your crew accomplish the following objectives:

  • Provide the appropriate level of lighting that allows construction work to be completed safely and effectively
  • Reinforce both the intent of the traffic control plan as well as provide better guidance for drivers traveling through the work zone; and, most importantly
  • Improve the overall safety of the workers and traveling public

Emergency lighting, on the other hand, is important to allow people to move out the work areas in case of emergency. This will ensure orderly exit and will keep people in the building from panicking. There are two types of emergency lighting units available – maintained (with a steady electricity supply) and non-maintained (not supported by electricity). Non-maintained emergency lights usually come in safety boxes and installed on the wall. They light up during power failures.

Choose the best lighting options

LED’s should also be considered for Temporary Construction Lights needs as they are cost-effective and offer brighter lighting. They are also more reliable and usually require less maintenance. For safety reasons, unauthorized personnel must not be allowed access to the construction site. Different types of barricades may be used for this purpose. Barricade lights are also important so people will easily notice warning signs, and to keep them away from specific areas or boxes enclosed by barricades.

When selecting the appropriate options in construction lighting to use, the most important things to consider are the various functionalities, and that the design and installation will not in any way affect the construction work going on. Likewise, the safety of all people concerned should be of primary importance. Other factors to consider are durability, cost, maintenance, and aesthetics.Temporary Construction Lights are the best. See more this site:

How To Use a Right Angle Handheld Flashlights

Nowadays, handheld flashlights are offered in a wide selection of features, shapes and sizes. Perhaps one of the most unique designs for flashlights is the traditional right angle. First introduced during World War II (under the TL-122 series), this compact luminary features a pronounced 90-degree angle at the light head and an optional clip at the arm for hands-free operation.

Accessories for right-angle flashlights include interchangeable lenses, different types of clips, belt holders and grips.

Comfortable and Hands-free

When it comes to applications in industrial facilities, right-angle handheld flashlights offer two main options for operators. First, it can be carried in a handheld manner, without extending the wrist. As a result, operators can hold the position of the lamp for longer periods of time. This is extremely advantageous in tight spaces and for tasks that take hours to complete.

Next, the luminary caters to hands-free options. The right angle of the base allows it to stand upright during operation. As long as the surface is even and flat, workers could set the light down. It is common for manufacturers of right-angle flashlights to allocate the batteries to the base of the unit. This configuration provides extra stability when used as a standalone light.

Selecting a Right-angle Flashlight

Some right-angle flashlights come with powerful magnets, which can also be used for hands-free operation on compatible (magnetic) surfaces. Alternatively, heavy-duty attachments on the luminary may be utilized to hang the light on ropes, chains or hooks for temporary, elevated (and hands-free) illumination.

Modern right-angle lamps leverage LED lights vover incandescent bulbs, resulting in longer lifespans, compact builds and sturdy operation. For rugged work sites, metal is the most common choice for the casing. Other options for the material of the flashlight include aluminum, high-strength plastics and more. For hazardous locations, non-sparking material is used to prevent the ignition of volatile compounds.